Friday, August 12, 2016

Installation Guide for Replacing a Differential Bearing Kit



*As always, these instructions are general guides to helping you; always check with your service manual for your particular machine to make sure that you have a clear understanding of the setup. If you are not experienced with installing parts on your machine, Boss Bearing always recommends taking your machine to a mechanic to ensure proper installation. You can buy the bearings through us, save a few bucks, and take them to your local mechanic to be installed!

Before you Start:

*It is important to make sure you clean your machine to prevent any problems going forward with the installation.
*Please be sure to follow the instructions thoroughly! If the steps to replacing any parts on your ATV/UTV are done improperly, this can lead to parts failure or possible injury.
*Once you take the new parts are out of the packaging, place the bearings in the freezer for around one hour; this will allow the bearings to contract to a smaller tolerance.

Remove The Old Bearings:

1.  Drain all of the oil out from the differential and then remove the actual differential from the frame. 
2.  Loosen the differential case bolts evenly and remove them. Next, remove the case cover by finding and using the pry points.
3.  Remove the old bearings and seals out from the differential housing. Match up the seals from the new kit with the old seals that you pulled out.  Please note:  there may be extra seals because most of these kits are designed to fit multiple machines.
4.  Now you will want to remove the ring gear bearings. Once you remove this, inspect the bearings for any wear and tear. Then use a seal pick or any type of flat blade to remove the oil seals. 
5.  Next, drive the old bearings out from the differential case. You will want to clean the bearing bore and make sure it is free of any grease or rust. Inspect it closely for any wear and tear. This is important to do so that the new bearings do not hang during the installation.
6. Remove the pinon gear seal using a pick. Next you will remove the inner lock nut.  A special lock nut tool is usually used for the gear shafts that are held in place by an inner lock nut. Be careful not to damage the case or threads while you drill out the stake in the inner lock nut. Now use a special lock nut wrench to loosen up the inner lock nut. Remove the pinon gear next. You can use a special puller tool for this. Remove the bearing from the pinon gear shaft. 

Installing The New Bearings:

1.  Use a bearing driver to install the shim and bearing into the pinion shaft. 
2.  Follow the OEM instructions to remove the needle bearing retaining ring.
3.  Next, use a bearing puller to remove the needle bearing. If the needle bearing is still in the freezer, remove it and install the retainer ring onto it. Now try and fit the needle bearing and ring into a compressor tool (common for Hondas). 
4.  Use the heat gun to heat up the case and then drive the bearing into the heated case. Use one solid strike if the bearing uses a retaining ring.
5.  Now you will want to make sure the bearing is fully seated in the case. If it uses a retaining ring, make sure it is seated fully in the groove. 
6.  Next, install the pinion into the case. Drive it into the case with a driver that contacts the outer race of the bearing.
7.  Now you can install the gear shaft inner lock nut. Tighten it to your OEM specification with the wrench. Without damaging the threads or the case, strike the inner lock nut with a hammer. 
8.  Apply grease to the new pinion oil seal and install it so it is fully seated on the bearing. 
9.  Place the ring gear with the correct shims. If this gives you any backlash, you should get it inspected to be sure everything is set correctly. 
10.  Using a heat gun, heat up the bearing bore and install the bearing that was in the freezer. Drive the bearing into its correct place using a bearing driver that matches the outer race and make sure it is fully seated in the bore.
11.  Now, depending on the type, install the cover with the O-ring, sealant, or gasket. Put the case bolts in and tighten them evenly to the OEM specific torque. 
12.  Now you are ready to install the differential back to the frame/swingarm, and put the machine back together. 
13.  Lastly, fill the final drive oil, and you are done!

Monday, May 9, 2016

Dirt Bike Installation Guide for Replacing Rear Wheel Bearings


*As always, these instructions are general guides to helping you; always check with your service manual for your particular machine to make sure that you have a clear understanding of the setup. If you are not experienced with installing parts on your machine, Boss Bearing always recommends taking your machine to a mechanic to ensure proper installation. You can buy the bearings through us, save a few bucks, and take them to your local mechanic to be installed!

Before You Start:

It is important to make sure you clean your machine to prevent any problems going forward with the installation.

Please be sure to follow the instructions thoroughly! If the steps to replacing the rear wheel bearing on your Dirt Bike are done improperly, this can lead to parts failure or possible injury.

Before you get started, make sure you prop up your bike on a stand to lift the wheels off of the ground.

Once it is lifted, you can begin to remove the rear wheel on your bike. To do that, unscrew and remove the axle nut, and remove axle bolt, then remove the chain off the rear sprocket, then remove the wheel.
*Note: be sure to watch for any seal spacers or washers that could fall out. Take the wheel you just removed and prop it up on a box, stand, or table so it is easier for you to work on.


Remove the Old Bearing:

Now remove the seals so you can see the actual bearing. You can remove the seals simply by using a screwdriver or pick. *Note: some wheels require specialty tools for the bearings to removed, reference your service manual or local dealer for tools and techniques before moving on.

To remove the bearing, use center punch and hammer to drive the opposing side bearing out using side to side tapping. Do the same thing to the other side. Try to avoid damaging the center spacer tube.

Install the New Bearing:

Clean the wheel thoroughly. Press the new bearings in by the outer race using a bearing driver. If there isn’t already grease on the bearings, go ahead and smear some on them. Be sure to replace the center spacer tube before installing the bearing on the other side. Now press your seals in and put the seal collars in place.

Now you can reinstall the wheel on the bike. Be sure to check for equal chain adjusting spacing, and you are good to go!

Monday, March 14, 2016

Dirt Bike Installation Guide for Replacing Front Wheel Bearings





*As always, these instructions are general guides to helping you; always check with your service manual for your particular machine to make sure that you have a clear understanding of the setup. If you are not experienced with installing parts on your machine, Boss Bearing always recommends taking your machine to a mechanic to ensure proper installation. You can buy the bearings through us, save a few bucks, and take them to your local mechanic to be installed!


Before You Start:


It is important to make sure you clean your machine to prevent any problems going forward with the installation.

Please be sure to follow the instructions thoroughly! If the steps to replacing the front wheel bearing on your Dirt Bike are done improperly, this can lead to parts failure or possible injury.

First, inspect your bike for any possible loose or worn parts: stem bearings, triple tree pinch bolts, etc.


Remove The Old Bearing:


You can now move on to installing the front wheel bearing. If there is any indication of rust forming on your front axle, polish it with sand paper to smooth the rust away. This is also a good time to check and make sure your axle is not bent from any rough terrain riding.

Remove the old seals with a flat screw driver or a seal removing tool. Then remove old bearings with a flat tip punch and hammer from the opposing side of the wheel. Clean the wheel/hub of all possible dust, dirt, and debris that could cause premature wear on the new parts.


Install the New Bearing:


Before you install the front wheel bearing apply a small, thin amount of grease on the axle. Also, make sure the pinch bolts are loosened up. 

Using a bearing driver, (or socket the same size as the outside diameter of the bearing), and a hammer, drive the new bearing out starting with light taping working it deeper into the bore until the bearing is seated. 

Flip the wheel to the other side and repeat the process. 

Be sure to reinstall the bearing center spacer tube, or the bearings will prematurely fail.

Once that is finished, be sure to tighten up the axle nut, and then tighten the left side axle pinch bolts. Be careful when tightening the pinch bolts: tighten the bolts evenly, usually about 12-16 ft-lbs. If the bolts are too tight, they can eventually cause the axle to bind in the future. Once the left side bolts are tightened, you can now fully turn the axle nut.

After all of this is finished, the axle, front wheel, and collars should be tightened on the left fork side, and the right side should be loose and able to float on the axle. Now you are able to align the right fork side for the final step.

To start, make sure the right fork axle lug can move with ease a few millimeters to the right and to the left over the axle without struggle. Once you can see that the axle lug is moving with ease, you can compress the front forks 2-3 times, allowing the fork leg to align itself on the axle. When the fork leg is then aligned, twist the right axle pinch bolts to the manufacturer’s specifications.

Once finished, check to be sure you did not spread your brake pads while installing the wheel. 



Copyright ©2016 Boss Bearing. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, February 29, 2016

History of the Honda Elsinore




The Elsinore, named after the famous Elsinore Grand Prix, was the lightest production motocross bike in the world, featuring the latest available technology and high-tech materials. Compared to the European offerings, the Elsinore was vastly superior in user-friendliness, ergonomics, carburetion, durability and electronics. The CR250M’s molded plastic, satin-finished aluminum and magnesium in the engine cases became the new standard. Not to mention an advertising campaign featuring none other than Steve McQueen!

CR125R Elsinore

The Honda CR125R Elsinore was produced between 1979-1983. In 1979 Honda came back in a big way. The 1979 CR125R was so new that no parts would interchange with the original ones. The motor output shaft moved to the right, and the bike was given a 23-inch front wheel. The bike was a radical remake, but its performance wasn’t as good as Honda fans had hoped for. A few years later Honda fixed most of the problems of the radical 1981 model, and once again the bike was a contender for ’best in class’. In 1983 Honda redesigned the 125 from scratch, moving the output shaft back to the left side of the engine. Everything about the Honda was new, and, this time around, it worked well right out of the gate. It was the fastest 125 of the year and handled well.


1979 CR125R Elsinore

Frame VIN: JE01-2000010
Engine VIN: JE01E-2000010
Color: Tahitian Red

1980 CR125R Elsinore

Frame VIN: JE01-2100025
Engine VIN: JE01E-2100069
Color: Tahitian Red/ black seat with red CR125R logo

1981 CR125R Elsinore

Frame VIN: JH2JE010-BC200032
Engine VIN: JE01E-2200031
Color: Engine is Tahitian Red / Tank Shrouds are White. Black seat with white 125R logo

1982 CR125R Elsinore

Frame VIN: JH2JE010-CC300001
Engine VIN: JE01E-2300001
Color: Tahitian Red/Black seat with white 125R logo

1983 CR125R Elsinore

Frame VIN: JH2JE010-DC400014
Engine VIN: JE01E-2400045
Color: Flash Red/Blue Seat with white CR logo. Swingarm decal with black 125R logo


CR125M Elsinore

The Honda CR125M Elsinore was produced between 1974-1978. Although the actual number is unclear, most experts say that the 1974 Honda 125 Elsinore was produced in greater numbers than any other motocross bike before or since. In 1975, the top of the tank was painted red rather than green, but it was essentially the same bike.


1974 CR125M Elsinore

Frame VIN: CR125M-1000009
Engine VIN: CR125ME-1000001
Color: Custom Silver Metallic / Expert Green

1975 CR125M Elsinore

Frame VIN: CR125M-2000006
Engine VIN: CR125ME-2000001
Color: Custom Silver Metallic /Tahitian Red

1976 CR125M Elsinore

Frame VIN: CR125M-3000001
Engine VIN: CR125ME-3000006
Color: Tahitian Red

1977 CR125M Elsinore

Frame VIN: CR125M-3100001
Engine VIN: CR125ME-3100001
Color: Tahitian Red

1978 CR125M Elsinore

Frame VIN: CR125M-3200025
Engine VIN: CR125ME-3200028
Color: Tahitian Red


CR250R Elsinore

The CR250R Elsinore was produced between 1978-1983. The most memorable aspect of the bike was its striking appearance. Everything, even the motor was fire-engine red, earning it the nickname: ‘Red Rooster’.

1978 CR250R Elsinore

Frame VIN: CR250R-2000010
Engine VIN: CR250RE-1000031
Color: Tahitian Red/CR250R Elsinore decal is yellow/white/black

1979 CR250R Elsinore

Frame VIN: CR250R-2100006
Engine VIN: CR250RE-2100006
Color: Tahitian Red/CR250R Elsinore decal is yellow/white/black

1980 CR250R Elsinore

Frame VIN: ME03-2001031
Engine VIN: ME03E-2000087
Color: Tahitian Red/Black seat with red CR logo

1981 CR250R Elsinore

Frame VIN: JH2ME030-BC00025
Engine VIN: ME03E-2300045
Color: Tahitian Red/Black seat with white 250R logo

1982 CR250R Elsinore

Frame VIN: JH2ME030-CC400021
Engine VIN: ME03E-2300045
Color: Tahitian Red

1983 CR250R Elsinore

Frame VIN: JH2ME030-DC500016
Engine VIN: ME03E-2500030
Color: Flash Red/Blue seat with white CR logo/Black 250R decal on Swingarm

CR250M Elsinore

1973 CR250M Elsinore

Frame VIN: CR250M-1000216
Engine VIN: CR250ME-1000001
Color: Custom Silver Metallic / Expert Green

1974 CR250M Elsinore

Frame VIN: CR250M-1000216
Engine VIN: CR250ME-1000001
Color: Custom Silver Metallic / Expert Green

1975 CR250M Elsinore

Frame VIN: CR250-2000001
Engine VIN: CR250E-2000001
Color: Clear / Tahitian Red / White

1976 CR250M Elsinore

Frame VIN: CR250-3000001
Engine VIN: CR250M-3000001
Color: Tahitian Red

CR450R Elsinore

1981 CR450R Elsinore

Frame VIN: JH2PE020-BC000001
Engine VIN: PE020E-5000001
Color: Tahitian Red/Black seat with white 450R logo


CR480R Elsinore

1982 CR480R Elsinore

Frame VIN: JH2PE020-CC100019
Engine VIN: PE02E-5100026
Color: Tahitian Red/Black seat with white 480R logo

1983 CR480R Elsinore

Frame VIN: JH2PE020-DC200018
Engine VIN: PE02E-5200001
Color: Flash Red/Blue seat with white CR logo/Black 480R decal on Swingarm


CR80R Elsinore

First launched in 1980, the Honda CR80R Elsinore became an instant hit with young novice riders and also in the ever more popular Junior Moto-Cross scene. Competition from Yamaha was fierce, but the CR80R has just kept evolving into a better machine over the years and is still one of their best.

1980 CR80R Elsinore

Frame VIN: HE02-5000020
Engine VIN: HE02E-5000024
Color: Tahitian Red/Black seat with red CR80R logo

1981 CR80R Elsinore

Frame VIN: JH2HE020-BK100009
Engine VIN: HE02E-5100001
Color: Tahitian Red

1982 CR80R Elsinore

Frame VIN: JH2HE020-CK200015
Engine VIN: HE02E-5200001
Color: Tahitian Red

1983 CR80R Elsinore

Frame VIN: JH2HE040-DK000001
Engine VIN: HE04E-5000001
Color: Flash Red/Blue seat with white CR logo/Black 80R decal on Swingarm


CR60R Elsinore

Nearly all of the development on the 1983 CR60R was done by Honda’s mini Factory rider Jimmy Button. After a somewhat tepid first outing, and a much improved 1984 effort, Button helped Honda develop a totally new liquid-cooled CR60R for the 1985 season. Oddly, Honda would pull plug on the new bike at the last minute (even though it was already developed) and end the CR60R program in America at the end of the 1984 season.

1983 CR60R Elsinore

Frame VIN: JH2DE010-DK000012
Engine VIN: DE01E-5000015
Color: Flash Red/Blue seat with white CR logo/Black/Silver 60R decal on Swingarm

1984 CR60R Elsinore

Frame VIN: JH2DE010-1EK100015
Color: Flash Red/Blue seat with white CR logo/Red/White 60R decal on Swingarm 


MR Elsinore Models

1975 Honda Elsinore MR175

Frame VIN: MR175-1000001
Engine VIN: MR175E-1000001
Color: Glare Green / Silver / Black

1976 Honda Elsinore MR175

Frame VIN: MR175-2000001
Engine VIN: MR175E-2000001
Color: Light Ruby Red / White / Black

1977 Honda MR175

Frame VIN: MR175-2100001
Engine VIN: MR175E-2100001
Color: Bright Red

1974 Honda Elsinore MR50

Frame VIN: MR50-1000001
Engine VIN: MR50E-1000001
Color: Daytona Orange

1975 Honda Elsinore MR50

Frame VIN: MR50-2000001
Engine VIN: MR50E-2000001
Color: Custom Silver Metallic /Tahitian Red

1976 Honda Elsinore MR250

Frame VIN: MR250-1000001
Engine VIN: MR250E-1000001
Color: Light Ruby Red / White 

MT Elsinore Models

1974 Honda Elsinore MT125

Frame VIN: MT125-1000001
Engine VIN: MT125E-1000001
Color: Custom Silver Metallic / Blue

1975 Honda Elsinore MT125

Frame VIN: MT125-2000001
Engine VIN: MT125E-2000001
Color: Custom Silver Metallic / Tahitian Red / Black

1976 Honda Elsinore MT125

Frame VIN: MT125-3000001
Engine VIN: MT125E-3000001
Color: Custom Silver Metallic / Blue / Black

1977 Honda Elsinore MT125R

Frame VIN: MT125R2F-1081
Engine VIN: MT125R2E-1081
Color: Primer White

1978 Honda Elsinore MT125R

Frame VIN: MT125R2F-1591
Engine VIN: MT125R2E-1591
Color: Primer White

1974 Honda Elsinore MT250

Frame VIN: MT250-1000001
Engine VIN: MT250E-1000001
Color: Custom Silver Metallic / Daytona Orange

1975 Honda Elsinore MT250

Frame VIN: MT250-2000001
Engine VIN: MT250E-2000001
Color: Custom Silver Metallic / Tahitian Red / Black

1976 Honda Elsinore MT250

Frame VIN: MT250-3000001
Engine VIN: MT250E-3000001
Color: Custom Silver Metallic / White / Aquarius Blue / Black

Thursday, February 18, 2016

ATV Front Wheel (Knuckle) Bearing Installation Guide





As always, these instructions are general guides to helping you; always check with your service manual for your particular machine to make sure that you have a clear understanding of the setup. If you are not experienced with installing parts on your machine, Boss Bearing always recommends taking your machine to a mechanic to ensure proper installation. You can buy the bearings through us, save a few bucks, and take them to your local mechanic to be installed!

Before You Begin:


Before you begin, please make sure you clean your machine thoroughly, as this is very important for proper installation of the part you are replacing.

Be sure your machine is properly supported with a sturdy stand or jack while working on it.

Remove all the parts from the new kit. Always check to make sure that every part you need is there.

Once the parts are out of the packaging, place the bearings in the freezer for around one hour; this will allow the bearings to contract to a smaller tolerance.


Remove The Old Bearing:


Now remove the knuckle from the machine you are working on. Also remove the dust seals with either a flat bladed screwdriver or a proper seal pick.

Finally, use snap ring pliers to remove the snap ring out (you can find these fairly cheap at a place like Harbor Freight).

Now that everything is removed, take and press the bearing out of the knuckle. Be sure to clean and inspect the bearing bores before moving on. There should be no rusty spots, grease, or grime on the bores. There should also be no wear and tear damage either.


Install The New Bearing:


Next you need to use a heat gun to heat up the area of knuckle, and take one bearing out of the freezer and place it into the knuckle. To press the bearing into place, use a bearing installing tool. You can also use a socket that matches the outer race of the bearing, if you do not have a bearing installing tool.

IMPORTANT: As you press the bearing into place, only press the bearing on the outer race.  You will damage the bearing is you press on the inner race.  Make sure the snap ring groove is clearly visible and the bearing is fully pressed into place.

After that is done, use your snap ring pliers to install the new snap ring into place.

Once that’s done, you can apply grease of the lips of the dust seal.

To finish things up, press the seals in firmly, either by hand, or by a driver that is equivalent to the outside diameter of the dust seal.

Place the knuckle back in and assemble the machine back together.

Lastly - try to  avoid pressure washing your machine around the bearings and seals. This will help the bearings to last longer.

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Decoding The Kawasaki Ninja



Nothing fancy here!  Sometimes you just need straight-up info!

1986 -2012 Kawasaki Ninja 250 EX250R

2012 - present Kawasaki Ninja EX300

1987 - 2009 Kawasaki Ninja EX500 (1994 - 2009 only change is 17 in. wheels and BNG)

1989 - present Kawasaki Ninja 600

Model Number     Model Name   Year


ZX600-C
Ninja 600R
1989-1997
ZX600-D
ZX-6
1990-1993
ZX600-E
ZX-6
1993-2002
ZX600-E
ZZR600
2002-2005
ZX600-F
ZX-6R
1995-1997
ZX600-G
ZX-6R
1998-1999
ZX600-J
ZX-6R
2000-2002
ZX600-J
ZZR600
2005-2008
ZX600-J
ZZR600
2005-2008
ZX600-K
ZX-6RR
2003-2003
ZX600-M
ZX-6RR
2004-2004
ZX600-N
ZX-6RR
2005-2006
ZX600-P
ZX-6R
2007-2008
ZX600-R
ZX-6R
2009-2012
ZX636-B
ZX-6R
2003-2004
ZX636-C
ZX-6R
2005-2006
ZX636-D
ZX-6R
2006-2006
ZX636-E
ZX-6R
2013-2014
ZX636-F ABS
ZX-6R
2013-2014

1992-2003 Kawasaki Ninja 750 ZX-7R (between 1990-1995 known as ZX-7)

1994 – 2003 Kawasaki Ninja ZX900 ZX-9R

2004 - 2014 Kawasaki Ninja ZX1000 ZX-10R

1990-2001 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-11 (C-model 1990 - 1993,D-model 1993 – 2001)

2000-2006 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-12R

2006 - present Kawasaki Ninja ZX14 (ZX-14R 2012-present)

Monday, January 11, 2016

2016 Boss Bearing Rider Support Program



Here at Boss Bearing we are looking for a few good riders to join our newly launched Rider Support Program.  It doesn’t matter whether you are a rookie trying to make a name in the racing circuit or an experienced racer.  As long as you give 100% in all aspects of your life, whether it is racing, school, work, family, or being involved in your community, we want you in our program!  We are looking for riders who are driven, focused and can conduct themselves in a professional manner on and off the track.
                We are always accepting new applications for motocross sponsorships and atv racing sponsorships but will only be evaluating new riders each quarter.  If you are selected we will contact you within 2-4 weeks, via e-mail, after the application due dates.  The 2016 selection schedule is located at the bottom of the blog post. 
                If you are selected to be in our Rider Support Program you will receive our Boss Bearing Promo Kit.  It includes Boss Bearing stickers, a Boss Bearing T-shirt, a Boss Bearing hat and other freebies that you can give out to your fans, fellow racers, and your crew. Riders will also receive a discount code that can be used for any products at our www.bossbearing.com website and discounts on items that are special order or custom aftermarket products.
                We do require a professional presentation and in your packet you should include:
·         Resume
·         Two or three letters of reference (from non-family members)
·         Report card or transcripts (if you are still in school)
·         List of bikes or quads that you currently own and race
·         Pictures (hard copies or .pdfs of head shots and action shots required. Links to photo sharing
        sites are a plus. CDs, DVDs and Memory Sticks will not be accepted.)
·         Social Media involvement with direct link URLS
·         Current Standings and/or Last season’s standings
·         E-mail address

Please note that anything you include in your packet will not be returned.
We prefer you to email your application to: ashley@bossbearing.com
However, you can also mail your application to:
Boss Bearing RSP
Attn: Ashley Young
2100 West Front St
Statesville, NC 28677
2016 Selection Schedule
First Quarter Selection: Applications due before March 31st 2016
Second Quarter Selection: Applications due before June 30th 2016
Third Quarter Selection: Applications due before September 30th 2016
Fourth Quarter Selection: Applications due before  December 31st 2016